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Tbilisi National Youth Palace is situated in the heart of the city, at Rustaveli Avenue. It was built in the early 19th century and in the fifties-sixties of the same century was reconstructed according to architect O.Simenson’s design.

The Palace has a very interesting history behind it. The events taking place there are reflected in the works of many well-known writers.

In the beginning of the 19th century this building was the residence of the Governor General of Caucasus and after the collapse of the Russian Empire in 1918 the local government - the Transcaucasian Seim was dislocated there. On 26 May 1918, during the meeting of the Transcaucasian Seim, Georgian delegation left the hall and in the adjacent white hall proclaimed Georgia a sovereign country. Noe Zhordania informed people gathered in front of the palace about this decision from the balcony. Two days later in the same hall the delegations of Azerbaijan and Armenia also announced their independence.

In 1921, after the annexation of Georgia by Soviet Russia, the government of Soviet Georgia was accommodated in this building. In 1937 the government adopted a resolution to give the building to the children. On this occasion academician Ivane Javakhishvili wrote: “This is a great thing that has been done to our offspring. From this time on the palace will turn into the centre for education of our future generations”.

On May 2, 1941 the Palace opened its doors for children and it became their property.

Source: www.youthpalace.ge
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2013

Vicegerent Palace - Tbilisi National Youth Palace

Tbilisi National Youth Palace is situated in the heart of the city, at Rustaveli Avenue. It was built in the early 19th century and in the fifties-sixties of the same century was reconstructed according to architect O.Simenson’s design.

The Palace has a very interesting history behind it. The events taking place there are reflected in the works of many well-known writers.

In the beginning of the 19th century this building was the residence of the Governor General of Caucasus and after the collapse of the Russian Empire in 1918 the local government - the Transcaucasian Seim was dislocated there. On 26 May 1918, during the meeting of the Transcaucasian Seim, Georgian delegation left the hall and in the adjacent white hall proclaimed Georgia a sovereign country. Noe Zhordania informed people gathered in front of the palace about this decision from the balcony. Two days later in the same hall the delegations of Azerbaijan and Armenia also announced their independence.

In 1921, after the annexation of Georgia by Soviet Russia, the government of Soviet Georgia was accommodated in this building. In 1937 the government adopted a resolution to give the building to the children. On this occasion academician Ivane Javakhishvili wrote: “This is a great thing that has been done to our offspring. From this time on the palace will turn into the centre for education of our future generations”.

On May 2, 1941 the Palace opened its doors for children and it became their property.

Source: www.youthpalace.ge

Image Credit

Left Image:

  • Year: Year Unknown
  • Source: burusi.wordpress.com
  • Photographer: Unknown

Right Image:

  • Year: 2013
  • Source: JumpStart Georgia
  • Photographer: Irakli Chumburidze

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