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The Georgian National Gallery was established in 1920. Dimitri Shevardnadze, a well-known Georgian painter, contributed significantly to the development of the gallery. Since its foundation, the gallery has served the development of Georgian fine arts.

The gallery itself was built based on a resolution from Russian tsar in 1888. The building was originally allocated as a Russian military and historic museum, known as the Temple of Glory, intended to showcase the power of the Russian Empire in its colonies. Artifacts from the Temple of Glory were evacuated during the First World War, putting an end to the museum's first phase.

In 1933, the municipal prison was moved from Metekhi to Ortachala, and Metekhi's historic building was delivered to the National Art Gallery's board of directors. The whole treasury of the National Gallery was placed at Metekhi in 1934, at which point the National Gallery re-opened to the public. Under Soviet rule, the National Gallery took the state's cultural policies and turned them in the direction of the fine arts.

In 2007, the National Gallery joined the Georgian National Museum complex. The main gallery building was once again renovated. New, modern exhibition space was added to the gallery, encompassing eight exhibition halls, a restoration laboratory, temporary exhibit reserves, training space, and a gift shop, all implemented by the Portuguese Architectural company "Ainda Arquitectura".

Source: www.museum.ge
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1992
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2013

Blue Gallery in Civil War

The Georgian National Gallery was established in 1920. Dimitri Shevardnadze, a well-known Georgian painter, contributed significantly to the development of the gallery. Since its foundation, the gallery has served the development of Georgian fine arts.

The gallery itself was built based on a resolution from Russian tsar in 1888. The building was originally allocated as a Russian military and historic museum, known as the Temple of Glory, intended to showcase the power of the Russian Empire in its colonies. Artifacts from the Temple of Glory were evacuated during the First World War, putting an end to the museum's first phase.

In 1933, the municipal prison was moved from Metekhi to Ortachala, and Metekhi's historic building was delivered to the National Art Gallery's board of directors. The whole treasury of the National Gallery was placed at Metekhi in 1934, at which point the National Gallery re-opened to the public. Under Soviet rule, the National Gallery took the state's cultural policies and turned them in the direction of the fine arts.

In 2007, the National Gallery joined the Georgian National Museum complex. The main gallery building was once again renovated. New, modern exhibition space was added to the gallery, encompassing eight exhibition halls, a restoration laboratory, temporary exhibit reserves, training space, and a gift shop, all implemented by the Portuguese Architectural company "Ainda Arquitectura".

Source: www.museum.ge

Image Credit

Left Image:

  • Year: 1992
  • Photographer: Unknown

Right Image:

  • Year: 2013
  • Source: JumpStart Georgia
  • Photographer: Irakli Chumburidze

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